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180 リアクション

theatlantic:

A Drone Delivery Expert Answers the Big Questions About Amazon’s Plans

Two and a half years ago, Andreas Raptopoulos founded Matternet, a company devoted to creating a network of drones that could deliver lightweight packages. It’s starting with medical applications, with plans to extend from there to “bring to the world its next-generation transportation system.” To hear Raptopoulous tell it, when the histories are written in a few decades, people will think: electric grid, road infrastructure, telephone lines, Internet, mobile phones, and … tiny flying drones. 
“We think about it not just as a point-to-point delivery, but as a network. What can you do if you have many stations of these flying drones?” Raptopoulous said. “What can you do with a system like this in the developing world, in our cities, in our megacities? We’re convinced that it’s going to be the next big paradigm in transportation.”
Of course, last night, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos revealed Amazon Prime Air, his company’s plans to use drones at some point in the future to deliver packages to customers. 
It all sounds a little crazy. And we can all think of many objections to drone delivery networks. They won’t have enough range! People will shoot them down! What if they crash! They can’t operate in places where you can’t get a steady GPS signal! 
Given that Amazon seems unlikely to give real answers to these questions, I contacted Raptopoulos, who has spent the last several years deeply engaged with these problems since working on a project at Singularity University in 2011.
Read more. [Image: Amazon]

theatlantic:

A Drone Delivery Expert Answers the Big Questions About Amazon’s Plans

Two and a half years ago, Andreas Raptopoulos founded Matternet, a company devoted to creating a network of drones that could deliver lightweight packages. It’s starting with medical applications, with plans to extend from there to “bring to the world its next-generation transportation system.” To hear Raptopoulous tell it, when the histories are written in a few decades, people will think: electric grid, road infrastructure, telephone lines, Internet, mobile phones, and … tiny flying drones. 

We think about it not just as a point-to-point delivery, but as a network. What can you do if you have many stations of these flying drones?” Raptopoulous said. “What can you do with a system like this in the developing world, in our cities, in our megacities? We’re convinced that it’s going to be the next big paradigm in transportation.”

Of course, last night, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos revealed Amazon Prime Air, his company’s plans to use drones at some point in the future to deliver packages to customers. 

It all sounds a little crazy. And we can all think of many objections to drone delivery networks. They won’t have enough range! People will shoot them down! What if they crash! They can’t operate in places where you can’t get a steady GPS signal! 

Given that Amazon seems unlikely to give real answers to these questions, I contacted Raptopoulos, who has spent the last several years deeply engaged with these problems since working on a project at Singularity University in 2011.

Read more. [Image: Amazon]

89 リアクション

theatlantic:

What Could Replace ‘Airplane Mode’?

The Federal Aviation Administration lifted the ban on using portable electronic devices in planes during takeoff and landing last month, thanks to efforts of critics like the New York Times’ Nick Bilton. 
The FAA’s ruling is a little more complicated than all phones, all the time. Rather, they’ll be “allowing passengers to use their devices from gate to gate, including takeoff, taxiing and landing. Cellphone calls will still banned,” Bilton explained. “People will probably be asked to turn their gadgets to ‘airplane mode’ when they fly.”
But it is probably only a matter of time before the airlines and the FAA give up on regulating their customers’ gadget usage. They are on the wrong side of history. And someday soon, the term “airplane mode” will likely become a true anachronism.
But what will become of the interface element? More to the point: ”What will they call ‘airplane mode?’” asks Bloomberg’s Eric Roston. 
Read more.

theatlantic:

What Could Replace ‘Airplane Mode’?

The Federal Aviation Administration lifted the ban on using portable electronic devices in planes during takeoff and landing last month, thanks to efforts of critics like the New York Times’ Nick Bilton

The FAA’s ruling is a little more complicated than all phones, all the time. Rather, they’ll be “allowing passengers to use their devices from gate to gate, including takeoff, taxiing and landing. Cellphone calls will still banned,” Bilton explained. “People will probably be asked to turn their gadgets to ‘airplane mode’ when they fly.”

But it is probably only a matter of time before the airlines and the FAA give up on regulating their customers’ gadget usage. They are on the wrong side of history. And someday soon, the term “airplane mode” will likely become a true anachronism.

But what will become of the interface element? More to the point: What will they call ‘airplane mode?’” asks Bloomberg’s Eric Roston.

Read more.

130 リアクション

thisistheverge:

Tumblr revamped for iOS 7 with new look, auto-complete tags, and faster reblogging
Tumblr has been a bit slow in updating its app for iOS 7, lagging behind both Facebook and Twitter, but a new version released today finally adopts the new aesthetics and animations of Apple’s latest OS. Aside from new visual flourishes and faster performance, Tumblr is also iterating on its native iOS app with some useful new features. First, it will now autocomplete tags for your post after you’ve started typing. With the improved search Tumblr rolled out last month, tagging your content is more important than ever, and the company is trying to make that process quicker on iOS. 

thisistheverge:

Tumblr revamped for iOS 7 with new look, auto-complete tags, and faster reblogging

Tumblr has been a bit slow in updating its app for iOS 7, lagging behind both Facebook and Twitter, but a new version released today finally adopts the new aesthetics and animations of Apple’s latest OS. Aside from new visual flourishes and faster performance, Tumblr is also iterating on its native iOS app with some useful new features. First, it will now autocomplete tags for your post after you’ve started typing. With the improved search Tumblr rolled out last month, tagging your content is more important than ever, and the company is trying to make that process quicker on iOS. 

52 リアクション

postarcadenp:

Gearheads rejoice!

Forza 5 is a technical masterpiece with a (slightly) stalled career

http://bit.ly/1887OXQ

Last year’s Forza: Horizon, while not as critically beloved or commercially successful as its numbered kin, is my favourite of the Forza games and perhaps the most fun I’ve yet had with a racing game.

It was a game that married simulation and arcade racing styles almost perfectly, providing loads of real-world cars with great handling that could be upgraded and tuned like crazy, as well as a vast open world filled with scores of unique tracks and heaps of deeply addictive objectives.

It was pretty much just what I’ve always wanted in a racer.

And it’s precisely because I enjoyed myself so much in Forza: Horizon that I was worried Forza Motorsport 5 – a return to the series hardcore car enthusiast roots, with an emphasis on car porn, authentic circuits, and league racing – would be a bit of a disappointment, despite the promise of gorgeous next-generation graphics.

I was right.

(nationalpostから)

303 リアクション

amnhnyc:

On Thanksgiving Day, comet ISON will pass within just 750,000 miles of the Sun’s surface. Should the comet stay intact, it will be clearly visible from Earth. 
Here’s Joe Rao, a meteorologist on News12 Westchester and a longtime presenter at the Museum’s Hayden Planetarium, with the details.

amnhnyc:

On Thanksgiving Day, comet ISON will pass within just 750,000 miles of the Sun’s surface. Should the comet stay intact, it will be clearly visible from Earth. 

Here’s Joe Rao, a meteorologist on News12 Westchester and a longtime presenter at the Museum’s Hayden Planetarium, with the details.